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Why 1.5m social distancing is so important!

Pandemics like Covid-19 are likely to become more common in the future, So be prepared!

Many countries were caught off guard when SARS-CoV-2 spread among the population. As epidemics and pandemics are likely to become more common in the future, governments, businesses and insurers are looking at options to increase the financial resilience of societies and economies in the run-up to the possible next event.

Covid-19 is part of a pattern of increasingly common epidemics coinciding with globalization, urbanization and climate change, according to the World Economic Forum (WEF).

Drivers of pandemics

Due to higher levels of mobility, outbreaks of infectious diseases are spreading faster around the world. In 2018, there were 4.2 billion passenger journeys in air transport – compared to 310 million in 1970. Air travel allows a person to travel halfway around the world in less time than is necessary for many diseases to hatch, making it extremely difficult to prevent their spread.

This improved mobility helped the rapid transmission of the coronavirus from China to more than 60 countries in just two months. Less internationally connected and less densely populated cities and countries, for example in Eastern Europe, are less affected than global hubs such as New York or London.

Increasing urbanization also contributes to a higher frequency of epidemics. As the world’s population continues to grow, it makes sense that the number of outbreaks and the people affected will also increase. Due to increasing urbanization and growth of the world population, people live closer together. According to the United Nations (UN), by 2050, 68% of the world’s population is expected to live in urban areas.

Climate change can also fuel the frequency of epidemics or pandemics, as higher temperatures promote the spread of mosquito-borne diseases, for example. According to the World Economic Forum Global Risks Report 2020, by 2080, 1 billion people could be exposed to mosquito-borne diseases in previously untouched regions such as Europe and East Africa.

Epidemics and pandemics can quickly reshape economies. The World Bank predicts that the global economy will shrink by 5.2% this year due to COVID-19. This would be the deepest recession since World War II.

Why 1.5m social distancing is so important

Since the outbreak in Wuhan, the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes the respiratory disease COVID19 has spread around the world (Zhu et al., 2020; Lu et al., 2020; Wang et al., 2020). To prevent the transmission of the virus from human to human, many governments have adopted a social distancing (SD) policy. For example, more than 190 countries have implemented national school closures.1 This and similar policies aimed to reduce interpersonal contacts to drive out the epidemic and ultimately save lives.

While experts agree that the spread of COVID-19 cannot be stopped, it can be significantly slowed down by measures currently summarized under the term “social distancing.” By limiting human contact, we can significantly reduce the transmission rate, increasing the time it takes to double things. Thanks to the nature of exponential functions, such measures can have a huge effect on the total number of cases after a certain time.


Epidemics outbreak readiness and business acumen

Outbreaks and epidemics cause more economic damage when they occur. Recent research on pandemics suggests that the potential economic losses due to infectious disease outbreaks are enormous and comparable in magnitude to the annual impact of climate change.

However, calculating economic losses on a global scale has major drawbacks; it can make the problem seem too big to solve, and obscures how the effects are distributed across geographic areas and economic sectors. For the future, a proposed alternative perspective provides tailored insights about the impact of outbreaks on businesses and enables them to respond appropriately. Among companies, the risk of infectious diseases is rarely emphasized in their risk assessments. If large corporations are fully aware of the commercial threat, they can no longer justify remaining on the sidelines of efforts to strengthen global health protection.

The outbreak of an infectious disease may be inevitable, but the economic damage they cause is not. By helping companies understand these risks, they can reduce their exposure, improve their resilience and create important opportunities for public-private partnerships to strengthen global health security. In doing so, companies not only act in their own commercial interests, but also help to mitigate the potentially devastating consequences of infectious diseases, both humanly and economically.

Economists estimate that pandemics will cause an average annual economic loss of 0.7% of global GDP in the coming decades — a threat similar in size to that to climate change. This is a level of risk that companies can no longer ignore.

Fortunately, there are initiatives with the aim of enabling (business) leaders to gain a better understanding of the expected costs associated with outbreaks of infectious diseases and to follow paths for public-private partnerships. These are intended to reduce costs and strengthen health security more broadly.

Hospitals, health and facilities organizations need to rethink how they use personal protective equipment (PPE), building on technology such as social distancing assistive devices to protect and empower medical personnel.

Read more about this on : https://www.weforum.org/projects/managing-the-risk-and-impact-of-future-epidemics


Increasing society’s resilience to pandemics

Wail KherraziFounder, Motivator, Innovation speaker8 itemsApril 7, 2021

Many countries were caught off guard when SARS-CoV-2 spread among the population. As epidemics and pandemics are likely to become more common in the future, governments and insurers are exploring options to increase the resilience of societies and economies in the run-up to the possible next event.

Covid-19 is part of a pattern of increasingly common epidemics coinciding with globalization, urbanization and climate change, according to the World Economic Forum (WEF).

Drivers of pandemics

Due to higher levels of mobility, outbreaks of infectious diseases are spreading faster around the world. In 2018, there were 4.2 billion passenger journeys in air transport – compared to 310 million in 1970. Air travel allows a person to travel halfway around the world in less time than is necessary for many diseases to hatch, making it extremely difficult to prevent their spread.

This improved mobility helped the rapid transmission of the coronavirus from China to more than 60 countries in just two months. Less internationally connected and less densely populated cities and countries, for example in Eastern Europe, are less affected than global hubs such as New York or London.

Increasing urbanization also contributes to a higher frequency of epidemics. As the world’s population continues to grow, it makes sense that the number of outbreaks and the people affected will also increase. Due to increasing urbanization and growth of the world population, people live closer together. According to the United Nations (UN), by 2050, 68% of the world’s population is expected to live in urban areas.

Climate change can also fuel the frequency of epidemics or pandemics, as higher temperatures promote the spread of mosquito-borne diseases, for example. According to the World Economic Forum Global Risks Report 2020, by 2080, 1 billion people could be exposed to mosquito-borne diseases in previously untouched regions such as Europe and East Africa.

Epidemics and pandemics can quickly reshape economies. The World Bank predicts that the global economy will shrink by 5.2% this year due to COVID-19. This would be the deepest recession since World War II.

 Insurers get hit

The lloyd’s of London specialist re-/insurance market has estimated that the non-life insurance industry is facing a whopping $107 billion in losses from the COVID-19 pandemic to the 2020 underwriting year. Including losses on the investment portfolio estimated at $96 billion, the total expected loss for the insurance industry will be $203 billion.

While COVID-19 will certainly represent a major loss to the insurance industry, many companies around the world will not have policies that respond to the disruption caused by the pandemic.

Policymakers have therefore begun to explore longer-term solutions to address the lack of protection against pandemic-related financial losses. Although the situation is still changeable, there are some concrete proposals and a market-ready solution from Munich Re in which Lockton participates.

 Possible solutions – Pandemic risk insurance

Various pandemic solutions based on public-private partnerships are being discussed. Such an approach could be similar to that in other risk areas, such as terrorism or flooding.

In the U.S., for example, New York Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney has introduced the Pandemic Risk Insurance Act (PRIA), a federal backstop for pandemic-related business interruption insurance modeled after the Terrorism Risk Insurance Act (TRIA).

https://www.locktoninternational.com/apac/articles/increasing-societys-resilience-against-pandemics

Possible solutions – Personal protective equipment

One of the things we need to work on is better technology for our personal protective equipment. So PPE stands for personal protective equipment, and you’ve heard a lot about it in the news – because in a respiratory virus pandemic, or really any communicable disease, we have to use many different personal protective equipment such as masks and social distancing devices. Want to know more about social distancing supported devices see: www.wailsalutem.com

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Behind the scenes, we are busy building and testing our new innovation in the field of social distancing.

WailSalutem social distancing device is made possible in part by MIT grant funds from the Province of Noord-Holland.

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If only they had WailSalutem Social Distance Supporting Device!

Police Diest takes to the streets with a stick. “Strange way to keep people at a distance

A strange sight in the streets of Diest, to say the least. Rob-tv’s colleagues saw how the police took to the streets with a stick to point out to people that they have to keep their distance from each other, one and a half meters. “We notice that some people still get too close to each other. That stick shows in a very simple way what the ideal distance is,” says Mayor Christophe De Graef.

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What is striking is that there is still hardly any use of technology. Although many organizations were busy with innovation last year, the applications in practice are still limited. Organizations that already have sensors in use on a large scale find them really useful and use them to measure how many people are in the building, but also to ultimately ensure that people stay 1.5 meters away from each other.

Hopefully our WailSalutem Social Distance Supporting Device, which will soon be available, will help entrepreneurs and make a living to beat corona and apply technology, in the facilities industry and at service providers such as at receptions, security guards but also at the police.